Friday, October 17, 2008

The telling of stories: the value of izinganekwane and iintsomi: Lebo and Onini

Lebo and Onini are Psychology honour students at Pmb Campus. Their project reports on the findings of two qualitative research studies conducted in KwaZulu-Natal and the Eastern Cape on the practice of telling stories, the value of these stories and the consequences of their demise. The question this presentation raises is: should the practice of telling iintsomi and izinganegwane be retained or discarded?

13 Comments:

At October 17, 2008 at 2:26 AM , Blogger Research Masters said...

I like the point made of telling izinganekwane above the point of entertaining - DG

 
At October 17, 2008 at 2:27 AM , Blogger Research Masters said...

A very informative presentation with a lot of things to discuss; and to advocate for in government as members of the black communities. ACCES TO ART BY CHILDREN IN KZN - S. Magwenyana

 
At October 17, 2008 at 2:29 AM , Blogger Research Masters said...

Its a very interesting research topic and agree with the fact that story telling must be practiced as they wil remind Africans of their background and also through story telling our society's behaviours could change for the better - Jabu Mnidi

 
At October 17, 2008 at 2:30 AM , Blogger Research Masters said...

Rather interesting way to look at how people get to construct/make meaning through cultural folk tales. - Sphindile Tshambi

 
At October 17, 2008 at 2:33 AM , Blogger Research Masters said...

Given the presence of the media (TV, radios) izinganekwane may not be so popular. There is a need to further explore the relationship izinganekwane has with the idea of positive behaviours. This shoudl be in line with current SA problems (e.g., HIV/AIDS, crime, etc.) - Sanele Zuma

 
At October 17, 2008 at 2:34 AM , Blogger Research Masters said...

Please continue with this academic work. There is a great need for indigenous language proficient social constructionist thinkers. - anonymous

 
At October 17, 2008 at 2:36 AM , Blogger Research Masters said...

Maybe the problem with izinganekwane is that they are based on old stories that had been told over and over. Perhaps we need to come up with new stories thatkids of today can relate to. - Roger Philo

 
At October 17, 2008 at 2:38 AM , Blogger Research Masters said...

I thought this intsomi presentation coulsd make a differnece in terms of changing the participants perception toward HIV/AIDS and it could bring about postive outcomes as they grow up. - S. Ndlovu

 
At October 17, 2008 at 2:39 AM , Blogger Research Masters said...

I would like to get a chance to read some of the izingabekwane & intsomi. - Tarryn Frankish

 
At October 17, 2008 at 2:41 AM , Blogger Research Masters said...

The study has good implications for further research on the impact of intsomi on behaviour (especially of adolescents). Intsomi can be very helpful in instilling less risky behavioural values in a child's early development frame. Also I felt that the study could also be very helpful in understanding the impact of intsomi in construction of group idenity. Xoli Mkhize

 
At October 17, 2008 at 2:43 AM , Blogger Research Masters said...

An interesting topic from young presenters, making a strong point about looking back on our values as black people. - S. Magwenyane

 
At October 17, 2008 at 3:03 AM , Blogger Research Masters said...

i'm so relieved its over,was so nervous but i'm so happy tha's its over. Oni gal we did a great job, we need to pat ourselves on the back!Mary thanks for encouraging us to present, your my ROCK STAR!

LEbohang

 
At October 17, 2008 at 3:08 AM , Blogger Research Masters said...

I was so nervous when I first did the presentation but I felt better as the time went on.I will be much better next time I have to present.Mary thanks girl fo all the support and patience you gave me.Like I said,I have learnt a lot from this process.Lebo my darling thanks for being a very good friend.

Onini

 

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